Thursday, December 02, 2021
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Introduction

When was the last time you went somewhere just to hear the sounds?

The atmosphere of a place is created by sounds as well as vision.
Sounds are not usually static but come as events in time.
How often do you pay attention to this?
How does this affect our response to place?

Whether experienced as a private meditation or as collective silence SOUNDWALKS will refresh your ears and reset your sensual awareness of where you live, work or visit.

A ‘soundwalk’ is a practice: it is walking without talking, focusing on the sound around, focusing on the present moment. In a `Sonic Gaze` session, the participants are static, though the sounds could be mobile. Talking might come later.

The Listening Room: Sonic Gaze is facilitated by Phil Morton & Robin Hartwell

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 This session has Lime Street Station as the starting point.
The Listening Room | Sonic Gaze Group | Soundwalks |…

Framework radio feed

framework radio

02 December 2021

phonography ::: field recording ::: the art of sound-hunting ::: open your ears and listen framework radio
  • #779: 2021.11.28 [luís antero]
    patreon campaign progress report:106 patrons (up from 104)50% towards our goal (up from 49%)want to help? http://www.patreon.com/frameworkradio this edition of framework:afield has been produced in portugal by regular contributor luís antero. for more of his work, see http://luisantero.yolasite.com, or https://luisantero.bandcamp.com. producer’s notes: [PT]Para esta edição do framework:afield resolvi fazer uma viagem sonora pelo interior de...
  • #778: 2021.11.21
    we've been a fan of éric la casa's work since he was half of syllyk back in the early 90's - it's as if his technique and aesthetic have developed along the same trajectories as our ears, and once again he doesn't fail to impress with his new everyday unknown series of abstract sound constructions. they blended nicely with the geographic captures of nikki sheth (south africa), jeff gburek (bulgaria) and paula schopf (chilé). we topped it all off with sounds from italy, canada, russia and czechia from the aporee soundmaps, and an introduction full of hailstones from northern ireland.
  • #777: 2021.11.14 [mark vernon]
    this edition, entitled magneto mori: vienna, has been produced in scotland by regular contributor mark vernon. for more information see https://meagreresource.com. producer's notes: Magneto Mori: Vienna is a fragmented sound portrait of the city constructed from found sounds, buried tapes and field recordings. In this de-composition sounds from Vienna’s past and present are conjoined in a stew of semi-degraded audiotape. [...]
  • #776: 2021.11.07
    old and new(er) friends in this weeks edition - i first met both howard stelzer and jeff surak back in the early 00's, while jilliene sellner (who put together the harbour me release) has been a regular contributor over these last few years, and anna xambó (who put me on to the dirty dialogues release) first got in touch a few weeks ago. their sounds sound like old friends, though; we hope you'll enjoy listening to this mix as much as we enjoyed making it. [...]
  • #775: 2021.10.31 [jilliene sellner]
    On 18 July 2021* members of Heya Collective simultaneously live streamed for 1 hour, from Turkey, UK, Lebanon and Egypt, the sounds of their immediate surroundings in response to the call out for World Listening Day 2021 (link: https://www.worldlisteningproject.org/world-listening-day-2021-the-unquiet-earth/). It emerged for us as time to come together apart, listening to the audible and contemplating the positioning of the callout and our experiences of the pandemic, as female field recordists, our relationship to one another and to the environment. The end result was not quiet, let alone ‘beyond the threshold of human hearing’, but an interpersonal and interspecies dialogue (often precisely because of the absence of each other and of other species’ audibility in those moments) of dispersed but connected ‘noisy’ realities.